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Nadrazi Holesovice Train

Prague's 13 railway stations have trains running towards: Amsterdam, Vienna, Berlin, Munich, Zurich, Dresden, Hamburg, Bavaria-Bohemia, Budapest, Poland, Slovakia, Austria, Hungary, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Serbia, Russian Federation, Ukraine and Croatia - and also to Plzeň, Brno, Karlovy Vary, Ostrava, and more cities in the Czech Republic. They also have rail freight transport at Nákladové nádraží Žižkov. The station at Bubeneč is closed.

Praha-Holešovice railway station (Czech: Nádraží Praha-Holešovice) is a railway station located in Holešovice, in the north of Prague, Czech Republic. Opened in 1985, it was originally used as a terminus for international fast trains coming from the east. Since the completion of Nové Spojení in 2008, these trains terminate at the more central hub, Praha Hlavní Nádraží, however, international and inter-regional trains going north from Hlavní Nádraží towards Berlin still stop here. The station is connected to the Prague Metro's C line by the metro station of the same name, and also to the Prague tram system by numerous lines.

 

Prague Railway Stations

  1. Praha–Bubny (Prague7 Holešovice)
  2. Praha-Čakovice (Prague18)
  3. Praha Hlavní Nádraží (Prague1 Vinohrady)
  4. Praha-Holešovice (Prague7)
  5. Praha-Libeň (Prague9)
  6. Praha Masarykovo Nádraží (Prague1 Náměstí Republiky)
  7. Praha-Satalice (Prague9)
  8. Praha-Smíchov (Prague5)
  9. Praha-Veleslavín (Prague6)
  10. Praha-Vršovice (Prague4)
  11. Praha-Vysočany (Prague9)
  12. Nákladové Nádraží Žižkov (Prague3 Freight Station)
  13. Praha-Bubeneč (Prague6 Closed)

 

Prague "Wilsonova" Central Railway Station

Praha hlavní nádraží (English: Prague main railway station, abbreviated Praha hl.n) is the largest and most important railway station in Prague in the Czech Republic. Located in Vinohrady, it was originally opened in 1871 and named Franz Josef Station after Franz Joseph I of Austria. During the First Republic and from 1945 to 1953 the station was called Wilson Station (Czech: 'Wilsonovo nádraží') after former President of the United States, Woodrow Wilson. His statue stood in the park in front of the station before being torn down by German authorities when the U.S. entered the war in 1941. A new statue of Wilson was installed in 2012. In 2014, the station served 224,505 trains and 27,000,000 passengers.

The Art Nouveau station building and station hall were built between 1901 and 1909, designed by Czech architect, Josef Fanta, on the site of the old dismantled Neo-Renaissance station designed by Czech architects Antonín Viktor Barvitius and Vojtěch Ignác Ullmann. The station was extended by a new terminal building, built between 1972 and 1979, including an underground metro station and a main road on the roof of the terminal. The new terminal building claimed a large part of the park, and the construction of the road cut off the neo-renaissance station hall from the town. In 2011 a partial refurbishment of the station was completed by Italian company Grandi Stazioni, which has leased retail space for 30 years from 2002. In 2016 Grandi Stazioni has lost the concession after failing to complete the renovation of the historic building by the extended contractual deadline.

The station was the embarkation point for the children evacuated by Nicholas Winton who were evacuated to London Liverpool Street station via the Port of Harwich. In 2009 a statue was unveiled on platform 1 commemorating this.

The station is an international transport hub, handling services to Germany (Munich, Bavaria-Bohemia RE (Regio-Express) services, and EuroCity/EuroNight services to Berlin, Dresden and Hamburg), Poland, Slovakia, Austria, Hungary, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Serbia, Russian Federation, Ukraine and Croatia in summer. Services are operated by express trains, and also by ČD Class 680 Pendolino. Services to Moravia, Silesia, Slovakia and Poland are also operated by open-access train operators LEO Express, RegioJet and Arriva.

In addition to the international services, trains serve most of the larger Czech cities, such as Brno, Plzeň, České Budějovice and Olomouc. The station is served by most of the Esko Prague lines which are not dispatched from the nearby Masaryk Railway station.

 

Masaryk Railway Station

Praha Masarykovo nádraží (Prague Masaryk railway station) is a terminal railway station located in the New Town area of Prague, near Republic Square (Náměstí Republiky). For much of its existence, the station has been named after the founder of Czechoslovakia, Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk.

It was the first railway station in the city to serve steam trains, and the second oldest railway station in Prague, Czech Republic (the first is Praha-Dejvice, formerly Bruska on the Lány Horse-drawn Railway). The station was designed by Antonín Jüngling and came into service in 1845.

Nowadays the station only serves regional and suburban trains, because the larger Praha hlavní nádraží does not have enough capacity. In 2010 it served 48,838 trains and 9.6 million passengers. The station is currently being reconstructed, and will become the terminus of the planned railway connection with Ruzyně International Airport.

 

Praha-Holešovice Railway Station

Praha-Holešovice railway station (Czech: Nádraží Praha-Holešovice) is a railway station located in Holešovice, in the north of Prague, Czech Republic. Opened in 1985, it was originally used as a terminus for international fast trains coming from the east. Since the completion of Nové Spojení in 2008, these trains terminate at the more central hub, Praha Hlavní Nádraží, however, international and inter-regional trains going north from Hlavní Nádraží towards Berlin still stop here. The station is connected to the Prague Metro's C line by the metro station of the same name, and also to the Prague tram system by numerous lines.

 

 

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