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PRG Ruzyne Airport

Prague Airport has two main passenger terminals, two general aviation terminals, as well as a cargo facility. Most flights depart Prague Airport from the North Terminals (Terminal 1 and 2). The South Terminals (Terminal 3 and 4) handle a few irregular flights, as well as VIP flights, special flights and small aircraft.

  1. Terminal 1 is used for flights outside the Schengen Area; it was opened in 1997, it includes concourses A and B
  2. Terminal 2 is used for flights within the Schengen area; it was opened in 2006, it includes concourses C and D
  3. Terminal 3 is used for private and charter flights; it was opened in 1997
  4. Terminal 4 is used exclusively for VIP flights and state visits; it is the oldest part of the airport which was opened in 1937
  5. There are also two freight terminals, Cargo Terminal 1 is operated by Menzies Aviation Czech while Cargo Terminal 2 is operated by Skyport.

Václav Havel Airport Prague (Czech: Letiště Václava Havla Praha), formerly Prague Ruzyně International Airport (Czech: Mezinárodní letiště Praha-Ruzyně, Czech pronunciation: [ˈpraɦa ˈrʊzɪɲɛ]), (IATA: PRG, ICAO: LKPR), is the international airport of Prague, the capital of the Czech Republic. It is located 10 km (6 mi) west of Prague Castle and is, with over 13 million passengers in 2016, the busiest airport in the newer EU member states. It serves as a hub for Czech Airlines as well as a base for Travel Service including its subsidiary brand SmartWings, and is also a base for low-cost carriers Wizz Air and Ryanair. The airport is able to handle wide-body aircraft including the Airbus A380.

In summer season 2017, 66 airlines fly to 154 destinations in Europe, Asia and North America from Prague Airport. It has 10 regularly passenger airlines flying widebody aircraft here, including daily service of Airbus A380 Emirates or Boeing 787-8I Korean Air 4 times a week from Seoul–Incheon.

 

Ground Transportation

Buses of DPP, the Prague Public Transit Co., stop at both terminals 1 and 2 frequently.

A Czech Railways public bus service, AE – AiportExpress, connects Terminals 1 and 2 with Praha hlavní nádraží every 30 minutes (5:30-21:00, ticket at driver 60 CZK). The journey takes 30 to 50 minutes.

From bus station in front of Terminal 1 there are also regular buses to Kladno, intercity buses of Regiojet run every 30–60 minutes to Karlovy Vary and Cheb.

 

Prague Airport History

Prague–Ruzyně Airport began operations on 5 April 1937, but Czechoslovak civil aviation history started at the military airport in Prague–Kbely in 1919. The Prague Aviation Museum is now found at Kbely Airport.

Due to insufficient capacity of the Kbely airport in the middle of the 1930s, the Government decided to develop a new State Civil Airport in Ruzyně. One of the major awards Prague Ruzyně Airport received include Diploma and Gold Medal granted in 1937 at the occasion of the International Art and Technical Exhibition in Paris (Exposition Internationale des Arts et Techniques dans la Vie Moderne also known as Paris 1937 World's Fair) for the technical conception of the central airport, primarily the architecture of the check-in building (nowadays known as Terminal 4) designed by architect Ing. A. Beneš.

In one of the most dramatic moments in its history, the airport was seized by Soviet paratroopers on the night of 20–21 August 1968, who then facilitated the landing of Soviet troops and transports for the invasion of Czechoslovakia.

Moreover, the Ruzyně fields provide opportunities for further expansion of the airport according to the increasing capacity demand. The airport serves as a hub of the trans-European airport network.

The political and economic changes affected the seventy years of existence of Prague–Ruzyně Airport. Some new air transportation companies and institutions were founded and some ceased operation since then. Ten entities have been responsible for airport administration over time, including the new construction and development. Until the 1990s, there were two or three-decade gaps before the major modernization of Prague–Ruzyně Airport began to match the current capacity requirements.

The airport stood in for Miami International Airport in the 2006 James Bond film Casino Royale.

An online petition organized by one of the best-known Slovak film directors, Fero Fenič, calling on the government and the Parliament to rename Prague Ruzyně Airport to Václav Havel International Airport attracted – in just one week after 20 December 2011 – the support of over 65,000 signatories both within and outside the Czech Republic. A rendition of the airport with the proposed Václav Havel name in the form of his signature followed by his typical heart symbol suffix was included in the blog's article in support of renaming of the airport. This name change took place on 5 October 2012 on what would have been Havel's 76th birthday. However, the PRG name of the airport for IATA and ICAO will remain the same.

It was the 38th busiest airport in Europe in 2016.

 

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