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  English Adverbs  
 

Adverbs modify a verb, an adjective, or another adverb.

 

An adverb tells more about a verb in the sentence.

  • The fire engine runs fast.
  • Listen to his speech carefully.
  • I browse the web frequently.
  • It rained hard.

An adverb describes more about an adjective in the sentence.

  • The news is very surprising!
  • The coffee is extremely hot, so be careful.
  • Nature is really amazing!

An adverb modifies another adverb in the sentence.

  • It rains very hard.
  • Computers run much faster these days.
  • I clean my room less frequently because I am busy.

Commonly, adjectives can be changed to adverbs by adding 'ly'.

  • slow - slowly
  • quick - quickly
  • comfortable - comfortably
  • loud - loudly
  • clear - clearly

To change adjectives ending in 'y' into adverbs, change the 'y' to 'i' and add 'ly'.

  • happy - happily
  • easy - easily

 

 

Quiz

Choose the correct word form in the following sentences.

1) I spoke to you (careful, carefully) last time.
2) We talked about it (clear, clearly).
3) I sat on the (comfortable, comfortably) sofa.
4) My dog runs very (fast, faster).
5) Let's install the new program (quick, quickly).

 

 

Conjunctive Adverbs

Conjunctive adverbs are words that join independent clauses into one sentence. A conjunctive adverb helps you create a shorter sentence.

When you use a conjunctive adverb, put a semicolon (;) before it and a comma (,) after it.

  • We have many different sizes of this shirt; however, it comes in only one color.

Some examples of conjunctive adverbs are: accordingly, also, besides, consequently, finally, however, indeed, instead, likewise, meanwhile, moreover, nevertheless, next, otherwise, still, therefore, then, etc.

  • The due date for the final paper has passed; therefore, I could not submit mine on time.
  • There are many history books; however, none of them may be accurate.
  • It rained hard; moreover, lightening flashed and thunder boomed.
  • The baby fell asleep; then, the doorbell rang.
  • The law does not permit drinking and driving anytime; otherwise, there would be many more accidents.

Conjunctive adverbs look like coordinating conjunctions (and, but, or, so, for, yet, nor) ; however, they are not as strong as coordinating conjunctions and they are punctuated differently.

A conjunctive adverb is also used in a single main clause. In this case, a comma (,) is used to separate the conjunctive adverb from the sentence.

  • I woke up very late this morning. Nevertheless, I wasn't late to school.
  • She didn't take a bus to work today. Instead, she drove her car.
  • Jack wants a toy car for his birthday. Meanwhile, Jill wants a dollhouse for her birthday.
  • They returned home. Likewise, I went home.

 

Quiz

Choose the right conjunctive adverb for the sentence.

1) Hurry up; , you will be late for the train.
2) I studied hard for the exam; , I failed.
3) Tom is a sportsman; , his brother Tom is athletic.
4) He didn't go to college. , he started his own business.
5) He is not good-looking. , he is popular among girls.

 

 

Basic English Grammar Lessons:

  1. Parts of Speech
  2. Vocabulary
  3. Nouns
  4. Pronouns
  5. Verbs
  6. Adjectives
  1. Adverbs
  2. Prepositions
  3. Conjunctions
  4. Articles
  5. Tense
  6. Gerunds
  1. Infinitives
  2. Passive Voice
  3. Mood
  4. Interjections
  5. Capitalization
  6. Punctuation

Learning Conversational English

 

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